Looking In The Wrong Place

December 12, 2014

Thought provoking snippet mentioned on the blog of Tim Harford:

“In 1943, the American statistician Abraham Wald was asked to advise the US air force on how to reinforce their planes. Only a limited weight of armour plating was feasible, and the proposal on the table was to reinforce the wings, the centre of the fuselage, and the tail. Why? Because bombers were returning from missions riddled with bullet holes in those areas.

Wald explained that this would be a mistake. What the air force had discovered was that when planes were hit in the wings, tail or central fuselage, they made it home. Where, asked Wald, were the planes that had been hit in other areas? They never returned. Wald suggested reinforcing the planes wherever the surviving planes had been unscathed instead.

It’s natural to look at life’s winners – often they become winners in the first place because they’re interesting to look at. That’s why Kickended (a site that details projects that receive zero crowdfunding on Kickstarter) gives us an important lesson. If we don’t look at life’s losers too, we may end up putting our time, money, attention or even armour plating in entirely the wrong place.”

See also Financial Innovation – Alternative Finance 2014.

 


Making Connections

December 11, 2014

knoweldgeFrom original artwork by Hugh MacLeod

The above picture was spotted in an interesting article on How to Generate More Good Ideas, and highlights the crucial role of connections. See also the illuminating quote from Steve Jobs below, on the potential benefits of having lots of dots.

steve-jobs=creative 2

 


Financial Innovation – Alternative Finance 2014

November 12, 2014

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Facts about Alternative Finance in the UK (click to enlarge)

I’ve been looking at alternative finance schemes for a few months now. There’s a lot of them and it’s not always straightforward comparing and contrasting them. Consequently it’s helpful that Nesta, partnering with the University of Cambridge, have just produced a large scale survey of the sector (the report is a free download, see links below):

Say ‘financial innovation’ and what comes to mind for many is the investment banks and complex products that were at the centre of the financial crisis. Yet in recent years we’ve seen the term become associated with a new type of finance provider, those businesses and online platforms gathering under the banner of alternative finance.

Finance models such as crowdfunding and peer-to-peer lending are at the heart of this as they harness internet technologies to bring those with money and those who need it closer together and aggregate numerous small investments or donations to meet large funding needs. Businesses, community groups and individuals are using this industry to either get funding they cannot access elsewhere or to get it quicker and on better terms.

Full details here (incl. the report) and there’s a handy summary-type blog post here.


Teaching To Learn

November 9, 2014

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In this context it’s also invaluable to remember that:

“You do not really understand something unless you can explain it to your grandmother.” – Albert Einstein

Doing the latter is actually not common or easy as people often take lots of things for granted eg jargon. This is related to the so-called ‘curse of knowledge‘.

See also a previous post on the role of collaborative conversation in education.

Topic first spotted on the blog of Nick Milton.

Picture credit here.


Thinking Differently With Feynman

November 3, 2014

“Study hard what interests you the most in the most undisciplined, irreverent and original manner possible.” – Richard P. Feynman

I wonder how many times a teacher or lecturer says that, or something similar, in class!

Of course it’s necessary to try to follow and understand the accepted way but there’s no harm and probably a lot of enlightenment in trying to think about things differently or originally as well.

Here are some other Feynman quotes to think about (click to enlarge):

Feynman Quotes

You might also be interested in:

Feynman Day At The Bloomsbury

Feynman And His Multifaceted Communication Skills

Picture credit here.


New Ways To Fund Science

October 22, 2014

Sean Carroll is a research physicist at the California Institute of Technology specialising in general relativity and cosmology. He’s written a number of well-received popular books on the subject (eg The Particle at the End of the Universeand is certainly media savvy.

In an interesting development, he’s currently trying to raise private funding for interdisciplinary research projects in his areas of expertise.

From Benefunder:

Your contributions will support Dr. Carroll’s research as he investigates fundamental challenges in theoretical physics. Funding will allow him to bring together researchers to tackle interdisciplinary questions that are not funded by traditional funding sources, and pioneer new and risky approaches to big questions. All contributions are useful – a few thousand dollars would support graduate students, while hundreds of thousands could fund postdoctoral researchers at a crucial stage in their career.

It’ll be interesting to see if this type of approach takes off as it may lead to viable new ways of carrying out leading edge scientific research.

Again, from Benefunder:

Benefunder is a marketplace that allows donors to find, fund, and follow researchers and other university initiatives in a simple, efficient way.

Benefunder partners with top universities to gain access to top researchers and initiatives across all disciplines to ensure that your donations go to the intended use. Researchers create and manage their profiles on our site, which must be approved internally prior to getting published. This way you always get the most up to date information regarding their work and can rest assured knowing that all our causes are in fact vetted.

See also Ten Things About Time You May Not Know.


Making Your Own Road

October 9, 2014

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Castle Mountain in the Canadian Rockies

A great way of procrastinating is looking for and trying out different (screen) wallpapers. As a consequence of this I have loads of them. I was wondering the other day why some appeal to me more than others. One theme I like is ‘roads’ although admittedly this doesn’t immediately sound very exhilarating.

An example is given above. In some ways it makes me think of a target/goal (lofty, in the distance, although seemingly achievable) and a path to get there. It also makes me feel that the target is drawing me towards it (but maybe that’s just me).

Of course, the real world is rarely so neat, and last weekend I came across the stunning image below which reminded me of the fact that you often have to make your own road and a clear target may be nowhere in sight!

Go Your Own Road by Erik Johansson.

Go Your Own Road, 2008, by Erik Johansson

A bit more on following the ‘indirect path’ in life and work can be found here (examples) and here (the theory).

PS If you feel like a diversion, some outstanding (free) wallpapers, such as the one at the top, can be found at InterfaceLIFT. A wide variety of resolutions and screen sizes are readily available…enjoy!

Photo credits: top and bottom.


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