Attitude, Approach And Business Success

In a previous post I commented on some interesting pen-portraits of well-known entrepreneurs and the likely role that ‘scientific luck’ played in their success. This in turn is related to their attitude and approach to life and business – see here.

In this context, it’s interesting to note that Seth Godin rated his key factors for business success as follows:

  1. Attitude
  2. Approach
  3. Goals
  4. Strategy
  5. Tactics
  6. Execution

Which leads the first two, the two we almost never hear about.

Approach determines how you look at the project (or your career). Do you read a lot of books? Ask a lot of questions? Use science and testing or go with your hunches? Are you imperious? A lifehacker? When was the last time you admitted an error and made a dramatic course correction? Most everyone has a style, and if you pick the wrong one, then all the strategy, tactics and execution in the world won’t work nearly as well.

As far as I’m concerned, the most important of all, the top of the hierarchy is attitude. Why are you doing this at all? What’s your bias in dealing with people and problems?

Some more questions:

  • How do you deal with failure?
  • When will you quit?
  • How do you treat competitors?
  • What personality are you looking for in the people you hire?
  • What’s it like to work for you? Why? Is that a deliberate choice?
  • What sort of decisions do you make when no one is looking?

Sure, you can start at the bottom by focusing on execution and credentials. Reading a typical blog (or going to a typical school for 16 years), it seems like that’s what you’re supposed to do. What a waste.

So maybe the two viewpoints are related?

In the broad light of the above:

“It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent that survives. It is the one that is the most adaptable to change.” – Charles Darwin

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One Response to Attitude, Approach And Business Success

  1. […] in the light of my previous luck and attitude/approach posts, it’s interesting to revisit the well-known stories: Gates’ emotional […]

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