Communicating Clearly What You’ve Done

Fortunately my days of annual appraisals and writing/reviewing CVs are long over but I’ve always been interested in the question of how you best summarise what you’ve done. It’s relevant to general conversations as well of course, especially with people that don’t know you well.

In this context, there’s an interesting post on a survey that was carried out for CareerBuilder to identify the most effective words to use in a résumé:

One in six (17 percent) hiring managers spend 30 seconds or less, on average, reviewing résumés, according to a new CareerBuilder survey. A majority (68 percent) spend less than two minutes. With so little time to capture interest, even a candidate’s word choice can make a difference. The nationwide sample of employers identified which commonly-used résumé terms are overused or cliché and which are strong additions.

Unhelpful words to use were (worst first): best of breed, go-getter, think outside the box, synergy, go-to person, thought leadership, value add, results-driven, team player and so on (no surprises there of course).

Conversely, helpful words to use were (best first): achieved, improved, trained/mentored, managed, created, resolved, volunteered, influenced, increased/decreased and so on.

The overall message is that it’s best to focus on the choice of action-oriented verbs rather than (often hackneyed) nouns and adjectives!

It also emphasises that when someone has ‘done something’ the precise words used are so important. For example, if someone is in a project team, although they can’t say they managed the project, they can say a whole load of other very impressive things: improved, trained, created, resolved etc.

In fact, the list of verbs given in the article might be a useful trigger for re-evaluating what you’ve done these past few years, and perhaps even prompt a better description?

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