Memorable Meetings

July 22, 2014

From Greg McKeown in the HBR (I’m reading his book Essentialism at the moment):

Mr. Frost, my superb economics teacher in England, once shared the story of two people talking about a lecture given by the late Milton Friedman, the father of Monetarism. The first said, “Twenty years ago, I went to the worst lecture I’ve ever heard! Friedman gave it and I still remember how he just muttered on and on and all I could make out was the word ‘money.’” The second man responded, “If you can remember what the key message was some twenty years later, I think it might be the best lecture you ever heard!”

Indeed, Friedman’s singular message — that by controlling the supply of money, you can stabilize the whole economy — became, arguably, the most impactful economic theory of the second half of the 20th century. The point I wish to emphasize is not an economic one, but a human one: if you try to say too many things, you don’t say anything at all.

He highlights a few key lessons he’s learned over the years in giving effective presentations:

  1. You can’t communicate what you haven’t defined i.e. be really clear, starting with yourself, about what you want to say
  2. Lose the slides and have a conversation – something my friend David Gurteen has been saying for years!
  3. Kill your darlings i.e. ruthless editing
  4. Be repetitive without being boring i.e. focus on the one message you want to hammer home

See also, Why Are Most Events Rubbish?

Rereading this latter post, it may be a bit unkind but the underlying point is still a good one and one that everyone still seems to be struggling with.

 


Thinking About Your Networks

July 16, 2014

Connected_780

This picture plus it’s accompanying discussion can be found here. It’s quite interesting to think about one’s connections in this way, even if it’s hard to be too specific about the measurement of the (time dependent) factors.


Sunny Side Up

July 3, 2014

Nadine May - Solar EnergyThe red squares represent the area that would be enough for solar power plants to produce a quantity of electricity consumed by the world today, in Europe (EU-25) and Germany (De).

Amazing fact/quote: ‘in just six hours, the world’s deserts receive more energy from the sun than humankind consumes in a year.’

From Wikipedia (which gives the history of the associated project plus it’s pros and cons as well as the remarkable graphic above):

“The DESERTEC concept was originated with Dr Gerhard Knies, a German particle physicist and founder of the Trans-Mediterranean Renewable Energy Cooperation (TREC) network of researchers. In 1986, in the wake of the Chernobyl nuclear accident, he was searching for a potential alternative source of clean energy and arrived at the following remarkable conclusion: in just six hours, the world’s deserts receive more energy from the sun than humankind consumes in a year.

The DESERTEC concept was developed further by Trans-Mediterranean Renewable Energy Cooperation (TREC) – an international network of scientists, experts and politicians from the field of renewable energies – founded in 2003 by the Club of Rome and the National Energy Research Center Jordan. One of the most famous members was Prince Hassan bin Talal of Jordan. In 2009, TREC emerged to the non-profit DESERTEC Foundation.”

Official site, for additional info: DESERTEC Foundation.


Luck And Learning

July 1, 2014

Quote from the entrepreneur Richard Farleigh:

Do you remember your best and worst business decisions?

I can remember the worst ones. Psychologists say when something works well we put it down to ourselves, and when something goes badly we put it down to luck. I try the opposite. All you can say is you learnt from each one.

See also here, on the fascination of failure.