The Creative Medusa

I was at the Theatre Royal in Winchester last week to see a production of Medusa.

Brought to the stage by one of the world’s leading female choreographers, Jasmin Vardimon presents her new work, which reflects on the powerful feminine symbol of Medusa, the myth and its various connotations in our contemporary life.

This epic production examines the gendered historical significance of the Greek myth, the symbolism and the philosophical idea of ‘reflection’. Created on the coast of Barcelona and inspired by its marine life, the show not only deconstructs the myth but also explores Medusa’s aquatic symbolism in the environmental future of our seas.

Celebrating 20 years of her company, Vardimon brings together a remarkable international cast with the artistic team behind her previous creations for the piece.

After the performance audience members will be able to share in a post-show chat with the performers.

The post-show chat was really interesting and brought out themes that were not immediately apparent. Apart from the obvious Greek myth connection, the director also mentioned the scientific connection. The jellyfish (the informal name given to the medusa-phase of the marine animal) – is the only known (nearly) immortal creature:

The Earth’s only immortal species is a tiny transparent jellyfish that travels the world in the ballast tanks of cargo ships. It’s the only known animal capable of reverting completely to a sexually immature stage after having reached maturity…

Down through the ages, there have always been myths about immortality, that godlike ability to live forever. Well, sometimes myths can have a nugget of truth. Indeed, it was our scientists—more specifically, the marine biologists—who found a creature that comes closest to immortality: a tiny transparent jellyfish.

The aquatic theme also connected to the awful plastic pollution of the seas and this was reflected in some of the scenes where imaginative use of sheets of plastic were used (as can be seen in the video clip above).

It was interesting to see this amalgam of scientific and literary themes. This would not have come out, at least easily, were it not for the post-show discussion. Hopefully they have more of these in the future.

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