Dialogue Versus Discussion

How much dialogue do you have a day? See here.

3 Responses to Dialogue Versus Discussion

  1. Luis Henrique says:

    Very useful and interesting.
    By the way, if we investigate the origin of both words, we get a similar insight.

    The first records of discuss come from the 1300s. It comes from the Latin word discussus, meaning “struck apart,” “shaken,” or “scattered.” Discussus derives from the Latin verb discutere, which is formed from the prefix dis-, meaning “apart,” and cutere, a form of the verb quatere, “to shake” or “to strike.”

    The roots of the word dialogue come from the Greek words dia and logos . Dia mean ‘through’; logos translates to ‘word’ or ‘meaning’. In essence, a dialogue is a flow of meaning . … To take it one step further, dialogue is a conversation in which people think together in relationship.

    Interesting, isn’t it?

    • David Pottinger says:

      Hi Luis, many thanks for the helpful comment and insight. The history of the words was something I was not aware of. It’s interesting that these words are often used interchangeably in modern day-to-day speech even though they allude to very different things (and behaviours).

      • Luis Henrique says:

        Absolutely! And this is the case with many synonymous… Each word, even when similar to others, has a precise meaning and a different impact when we communicate with other people.

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