The Challenge Of Reinventing Yourself

October 9, 2020

Helpful sketchnote from Tanmay Vora on career reinvention (see his site for many other related sketchnotes).

I’ve commented previously (see here) on how reinvention can be viewed as a sort of personal R&D.


Recent Chinese Achievements

October 2, 2020


I wasn’t aware of the tremendous scope of recent Chinese technical achievements and it was handy that someone had trawled the web to put this presentation together. Full article is here.

I can’t find an original reference for this presentation (it came through social media). Google searches didn’t produce anything immediately but the content is certainly thought provoking at the very least. Worth a look.

Two sample slides, above and below (68 in total)


Dialogue Versus Discussion

June 30, 2020

How much dialogue do you have a day? See here.


The Biases We Often Have, Mostly Unknowingly

June 16, 2020

Good infographic of some of the more well-known cognitive biases. A full list (over 150 of them) is available here:

“Although the reality of most of these biases is confirmed by reproducible research, there are often controversies about how to classify these biases or how to explain them…

There are also controversies over some of these biases as to whether they count as useless or irrational, or whether they result in useful attitudes or behavior. For example, when getting to know others, people tend to ask leading questions which seem biased towards confirming their assumptions about the person. However, this kind of confirmation bias has also been argued to be an example of social skill: a way to establish a connection with the other person.”

It’s often useful to review these biases prior to making final decisions as it can shed deeper insights into why you’re taking the approach you favour.

At the same time, worth bearing in mind that:

“Your personal experiences make up maybe 0.00000001% of what’s happened in the world but maybe 80% of how you think the world works… We’re all biased to our own personal history.” – Morgan Housel


You May Both Be Wrong

June 11, 2020

“Do not condemn the judgment of another because it differs from your own. You may both be wrong.” – Dandemis (philosopher of Ancient India)


Saying No

May 8, 2020

Spotted this interesting quote:

“When you say no you are only saying no to one option. When you say yes, you are saying no to every other option.

No is a choice. Yes is a responsibility.”

I’ve written on this topic a number of times previously, for instance, see here.


The Importance of Taking Breaks

October 17, 2019

I read this remarkable story on GTD Focus:

At some point though, we need to shut it all down, kick back in our metaphorical Barcalounger, and let our minds float off on their own for a while.

Franklin Roosevelt understood this. Throughout his adult life, as Governor of New York to President of the United States – on the day the stock market crashed and the day the Pacific Fleet was destroyed at Pearl Harbour – Roosevelt paused every late afternoon for cocktail hour. He brought together the people working around him, often made the cocktails himself, and paused from the day’s occupation.

On Pearl Harbor day, this pause was between drafting his “Day of Infamy” speech, and his speech to the nation in front of the joint session of Congress he was asking to declare war.

Roosevelt’s best was essential nearly every day of his adult life, and no day more than this one.

Essential to our best is rest and recovery. Roosevelt offers a formidable example of how strength is nurtured and refreshed.

The story vividly illustrates the importance of taking regular breaks (long or short) to relax and refresh. Annoyingly this can happen when you feel you have the very least time for them. Hindsight often reveals that the tasks that seemed so important diminish and the bigger picture appears and it’s then difficult to understand not being able to take a break. A ritual, like Roosevelt’s, might help.

“Don’t get so busy making a living that you forget to make a life.” – Dolly Parton


Personal Bias

August 28, 2019

“Your personal experiences make up maybe 0.00000001% of what’s happened in the world but maybe 80% of how you think the world works… We’re all biased to our own personal history.” – Morgan Housel


Delivering Results

August 22, 2019

Interesting tweet from the productivity writer James Clear:

“Results = (Hard Work*Time)^Strategy

Working hard is important, but working on the right thing is more important. A great strategy can deliver exponential results.

Of course, the best strategy is worth nothing if you never get to work. Zero to the millionth power is still zero.”

Note the power law for strategy! So worth reviewing whether other strategies are possible.


How to See Things Through

March 26, 2019

After prevaricating on a couple of personal projects, I fortunately came across a list of suggestions for seeing things through (see here for full details):

  1. Share less of your plans with those around you – doing it first and then sharing is a much better approach;
  2. Work on a long-term task regularly, dedicating a certain amount of time to it (daily for 20 minutes, weekly for 1 hour, monthly for half a day, etc.);
  3. Adjust your plans all the time – that way you will cross the finish line having wasted no time on the way;
  4. Don’t accumulate new tasks in the meantime – try not to start anything new until you’ve finished the current task;
  5. Hit the ground running – as soon as you’ve got a new task, do your best to handle all aspects of it without delaying, even if those may appear as little things;
  6. Get inspired all the time – inspiration makes you more active and positive, so look for potential sources in music, a hobby, being around your friends etc.;
  7. If you haven’t gotten around to the task in the first three days, you might as well forget about it, since 72 hours weren’t enough to get started;
  8. Don’t be afraid to dream – remember that thoughts are material, so if at least 50% of your wildest dreams realize, that’s great already.

The most relevant ones for me are the first two. I’ve tried telling people about achievements (even if small ones) rather than ideas and it’s certainly heightened interest. The second one, of regular determined effort towards a lengthy goal, is also delivering results. To increase motivation and focus, I’ve started doing ‘realistic’ weekly reviews to monitor progress. This has lead to me stopping doing quite a few things (the famous ‘not to do list’). It was quite a surprise to see how easy it is to fritter away time on all sorts of relatively unimportant tasks!